Source Molecular Supports 2017 SOLM Conference

Microbial source tracking was one of the topics discussed at the Great Lakes Beach Association Workshops held together with the 2017 State of Lake Michigan or SOLM Conference from November 7 to 10 at the Hyatt Regency in Green Bay, Wisconsin.

Dr. Shannon Briggs of the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality coordinated the MST workshop. An Introduction to Beach Monitoring and a discussion on Beach Sanitary Surveys and Mitigation preceded the MST workshop. Afterwards, Sonya Carlson coordinated a talk on Virtual Beach Modeling – Tips for Success.

A Beach Managers Roundtable was also held in collaboration with IJC Health Professionals Advisory Board. Dr. Briggs conducted qPCR Meetings with participants in the Multi‐Lab Validation Study for draft Method C, Michigan health departments on draft Method C results, and a work group for source tracking validation study.

The International Association for Great Lakes Research hosted the SOLM Conference, a biennial event dating back to 1999. Source Molecular Corporation supported the event as one of its exhibitors with Scott Harding as its representative.

E. coli Studies Featured at SOLM Conference

The conference also included sessions about Escherichia coli (E. coli), a fecal indicator bacteria:

* Abhilasha Shrestha, University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health — “Evaluation of Rapid qPCR Method for detection of E. coli in Lake Michigan beaches”

* Nick Lucius, City of Chicago — “Predicting E. coli concentrations using limited qPCR
deployments at Chicago beaches”

* Rich Haugland, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — “Results of the 2016 multi-lab
evaluation study of EPA draft Method C: Quantitative PCR for E. coli”

Organizers view the 2017 SOLM Conference as “the first in an annual series of State of Lake conferences aimed at promoting linkages between the science and policy communities.” Similarly, Source Molecular’s mission is to fill the void between source identification research and real-world implementation of the technology.

High levels of bacteria in water cause alarm to communities, prompting health officials and regulators to find ways to reduce them. MST helps identify the bacteria sources so that stakeholders would be able to craft effective remediation plans. Source Molecular uses quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method for its MST analysis. Its laboratory also offers Droplet Digital PCR for MST and Pathogen Detection.

Digital PCR provides absolute quantification, telling stakeholders exactly how much bacteria is in the water. But since not all bacteria pose a threat to humans, Source Molecular’s Pathogen Detection service can provide better guidance to water managers.

Learn more about these MST and Pathogen Detection services by scheduling a time to talk with Source Molecular.

2017-11-22T04:03:29+00:00